Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Discussion: Diagnosis of Andrew | Refine papers
  

This week, you have an opportunity to put your diagnostic skills to practice while also receiving feedback from your peers. In real-world counseling practice, case consultation and staff discussions are essential to sound mental health practice, so it is important to feel comfortable giving and receiving feedback related to diagnosis.

To prepare for the Discussion:

Review this week?s Learning Resources.
To assist with your understanding with what should be included in a case conceptualization, review the case study of Caden provided in the Learning Resources.
Read Andrew?s case study in Kress and Paylo (2019).
Assess and diagnose Andrew.
By Day 3
Post a brief summary of Andrew using the following format:

Case Conceptualization (Include specific information about client symptoms and presenting concerns.)
Diagnostic Impressions (Be sure to use the ICD-10 code, name of the disorder, and all specifiers.)
Rationale for Diagnostic Impressions (Include the diagnostic impressions using the DSM-5 to link the client?s symptoms to the diagnostic criteria for each diagnosis that you render. If you do not render a diagnosis, you still must use the DSM-5 to explain why you chose not to render a diagnosis.)
Note:? For this Discussion, you are required to complete your initial post before you will be able to view and respond to your colleagues? postings. Begin by clicking on the ?Post to Discussion Question? link, and then select ?Create Thread? to complete your initial post. Remember, once you click on ?Submit,? you cannot delete or edit your own posts, and you cannot post anonymously. Please check your post carefully before clicking on?Submit!

By Day 6
Respond to at least one of your colleague?s posts and identify:

Other diagnoses that your colleague should consider further in their ongoing work (i.e., potential differential diagnostic considerations)
Either a cultural or ethical consideration that may be pertinent to the diagnosis
Required Readings
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Section II, ?Neurocognitive Disorders?
Section II, ?Elimination Disorders?
Kress, V. E., & Paylo, M. J. (2019). Treating those with mental disorders: A comprehensive approach to case conceptualization and treatment (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Pearson.

Chapter 12, ?Disruptive, Impulse-Control, and Conduct Disorders, and Elimination Disorders?

Case Conceptualization
(Include specific information about client symptoms and presenting concerns).

Caden, a 12-year-old Caucasian male, is experiencing difficulty at home and school. Caden currently lives with his grandmother due to his mother?s reported substance use and legal concerns. Caden has demonstrated aggressive and threatening behavior with both peers and his teacher. Caden has displayed oppositional behavior (e.g., refusing to talk to his grandmother for days at a time). He has experienced academic difficulties and is currently on academic probation. He has also experienced threatening and violent behaviors. His symptoms appear to have begun at age 9.

Diagnostic Impressions
(Be sure to use the ICD-10 code, name of the disorder, and all of the specifiers)

F91.1 Conduct Disorder, Childhood-Onset Type, Moderate

Rationale for Diagnostic Impressions
(Include the diagnostic impressions using the DSM-5 to link the client?s symptoms to the diagnostic criteria for each diagnosis that you render. If you do not render a diagnosis, you still must use the DSM-5 to explain why you chose not to render a diagnosis.)

Based on the case presentation, Caden appears to be demonstrating symptoms consistent with F91.9 Conduct Disorder. Caden has demonstrated a repetitive and persistent pattern of violating the rights of others and age-appropriate norms (Criterion A) as evidenced by getting in three physical fights during the past year (Criterion A2), bullying peers (criterion A1), vandalizing cars, and threatening an individual with a knife (Criterion A3). The client intentionally vandalized the property of others (Criterion A9) and stole money for his teacher (Criterion A12).

The client is experiencing clinically significant distress (Criterion B) as evidenced by his difficulty at school, his recent legal charges, and being mandated to counseling by the Juvenile Justice Center. The client is 12-years-old and thus he fulfills Criterion C of the diagnosis (i.e., the client is under 18-years-old and does not meet criteria for Antisocial Personality Disorder). It appears that the client?s symptoms began at approximately age 9, and thus, the Childhood-onset type (i.e., one symptom before age 10) is most appropriate. At this time, it appears that the ?moderate? severity specifier best describes the client?s symptoms. The client has stolen but without confronting his victim, has used a knife the threaten a store owner, and has demonstrated oppositional behavior toward his primary caregiver.

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